L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
Geo M. Hill Co. – 1900


Synopsis
This book tells the story of the adventures of Dorothy and her little dog in the weird and wonderful world of Oz. Along the renowned Yellow Brick Road that Elton John turned into song – as the pair head towards Emerald City, Dorothy encounters the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman and, finally, the Cowardly Lion and together discover their virtues: intelligence, love and courage. One of the best loved children’s stories in North American literature, this work is a hymn to the true meaning of friendship.


Biography
Lyman Frank Baum was born in the city of Chittenango, New York State, in May 1856 and died in Hollywood in May 1919. He was a theater actor, merchant, journalist, and writer. His most celebrated work is The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, originally published in 1900, gave rise to a major Hollywood production of the same name, whose character Dorothy was performed beautifully by actress Judy Garland (1922–1969).
L. Frank Baum also wrote a play, The Maid of Arran, a book of poems, By the Candelabra's Glare, and several other fantasy works, such as Dot and Tot of Merryland, American Fairy Tales, The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus and The Enchanted Island of Yew.


FunFacts
THE PENCIL
Baum framed the pencil he used to write The Wizard of Oz and hung it on the wall of his studio.

THE BOOK SOLD OUT IN TWO WEEKS
According to the publisher, the first printing of 10 000 copies sold out in two weeks, followed by a second printing of 15 000 and a third printing of 10 000. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz remained a bestseller for two years.

DOROTHY'S SHOES WERE SILVER, NOT RUBY RED
The color was changed for the 1939 movie starring Judy Garland because the filmmakers thought that ruby red looked better in Technicolor.

BAUM FOUNDED AN EARLY MOVIE STUDIO IN HOLLYWOOD
Baum moved to Hollywood in 1910, just as the film industry was getting started there. He produced a handful of silent films but they weren’t successful and the company shut down the following year.

WIZARD OF OZ ADAPTATION
One of Baum’s sons co-wrote a Wizard of Oz adaptation that made it to the big screen in 1925.

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