Charles Dickens – The Adventures of Oliver Twist
Bradbury & Evans - 1846


Synopsis
“The Adventures of Oliver Twist” is a scathing satire on ruthless nineteenth-century society and reflects all the issues associated with Charles Dickens - poverty, despair, fear, temptation and the eventual triumph of good in the face of great adversity.
Charles Dickens wrote this work at the age of twenty-five, under the subtitle The Parish Boy's Progress. The first edition was published between 1837 and 1839 in the magazine Bentley’s Miscellany, under the pseudonym “Boz”. This story stands out for being the first English novel to have a child as protagonist, being edited in a book, in 1838, even before its completion.


Biography
The name Charles Dickens (1812–1870) transports us to everlasting novels, which reflect a world where good and bad coexist. Dickens was the first great social critic of his contemporary England, portraying, above all, the urban space as ruthless, marked by the dehumanization of the advent of the machine and materialistic hypocrisy. Responsible for great masterpieces of universal literature, such as A Christmas Carol, Great Expectations, David Copperfield and The Adventures of Oliver Twist, the author gave life to iconic and immortal characters, who were represented outside the books, serving as inspiration for successful plays, musicals and films.

Charles Dickens was already famous due to The Pickwick Papers, however with The Adventures of Oliver Twist, set in the heyday of the Industrial Revolution, he saw his reputation consolidated by introducing some of the author's most persistent characters, such as Oliver himself (who dares to ask for more), the tyrannical Bumble, the devilish Fagin, the menacing Bill Sikes, Nancy and the «Artful Dodger».
The first edition of this work came at an economically and socially difficult time in British history, as a result of the Poor Law Amendment Act, in 1834, which led to the proliferation of workhouses – spaces where people without livelihoods were put to live and work. Therefore, Dickens criticizes the shortcomings in this system, since only those who lived in these houses were entitled to services such as health and education.


FunFacts
CHARLES DICKENS PUBLISHED SOME OF HIS WORKS UNDER A PSEUDONYM
In 1834, Charles Dickens started signing his work as “Boz”. This single-syllable name came from a childhood rendering of the character Moses, from Irish writer Oliver Goldsmith’s 1766 novel The Vicar of Wakefield, later mentioned in Dickens’s A Tale of Two Cities.

CHARLES DICKENS USED SUSPENSE TO HOLD READERS TO HIS TALES
Such as The Adventures of Oliver Twist, many of the works by Charles Dicken were first printed as serialized novels, published in monthly or weekly journals. This way, the author introduced suspenseful moments in each chapter to captivate readers and lead them to buy the following story numbers.

CHARLES DICKENS WAS A GHOST HUNTER
The Victorian era was marked by a deep belief in spirituality. In fact, Charles Dickens, along with other authors such as Arthur Conan Doyle and William Butler Yeats, joined the Ghost Club, a group dedicated to investigating the paranormal and exposing fraud.

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