Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
T. Egerton, Whitehall - 1813


Synopsis
The meeting between the opinionated Elizabeth Bennet and the proud and somber Mr. Darcy is an extraordinary portrait of a civilizational confrontation. The most loved of all Austen’s novels provides an unforgettable account of the inaccuracies of first impressions, the power of reason and, above all, the strange dynamics ongoing in human relationships and all their emotions. A magnificent comedy of customs in the Georgian period Britain.


Biography
Jane Austen (1775–1817) was born in Steventon, in Hampshire, in December 1775 and was to pass away in this same region of Britain in July 1817. While remaining unknown to the general public during her short life, her popularity surged after 1869 before achieving recognition in the 20th century as a truly classic author and one of the greatest writers in the English language for her works merging romanticism and realism into a single narrative thread, with her wise and intuitive perceptions encapsulated in the incisive portraits of common persons that underpin her timelessly enjoyable novels.
In addition to the novel Pride and Prejudice, published in 1813 long after Austen had finished writing it, not yet aged 22, in 1797, another of the most popular novels in British literary history, Sense and Sensibility, in conjunction with Mansfield Park and Emma were all published during her life while Northanger Abbey, Sanditon and Persuasion would only come out after her death.
 

FunFacts
PRIDE AND PREJUDICE WAS REJECTED BY A PUBLISHER IN 1917
Jane Austen finished writing her second novel when she was barely 21 years old, in 1797. The manuscript was sent by her father to a publisher – Thomas Cadell – asking him about the publication costs and possible royalties. Unopened, the letter was returned to him and the publication rejected.

JANE AUSTEN PUBLISHED HER BOOKS ANONYMOUSLY 
In 1811, Sense and Sensibility was signed “by a Lady” and, two years later, Pride and Prejudice vaguely referred to the author as “by the author of Sense and Sensibility”. Only after Jane Austen’s death, one of her brothers identified her as the rightful author.

JANE AUSTEN DIDN’T MARRY BECAUSE OF HER SOCIAL STATUS
In Jane Austen’s books we often meet lower class young women looking for good marriages. The author herself lived a similar experience. When she was 20 years old, she fell in love with Thomas Lefroy (1776-1869), but couldn’t marry him because of her economic condition. Lefroy ended up marrying Mary Paul in 1799.

MR. DARCY WOULD BE THE EQUIVALENT OF A ROCKEFELLER OR A VANDERBILT
In Pride and Prejudice, we know Mr. Darcy fortune is due to an income of 10 000 £ per year. In 2013, a Telegraph’s article mentioned this would nowadays correspond to 12 000 000£ (14 045 190€). This means that, today, marrying Mr. Darcy would be like marrying a Rockefeller or a Vanderbilt.

JANE AUSTEN WAS QUOTED IN COURT – AT LEAST 27 TIMES
Jane Austen is one of the most quoted female writers on legal actions – along with Harper Lee and Mary Shelley. Most cases are related to relationships and social discrimination.


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