J. M. Barrie, Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens
Hodder & Stoughton – 1906


Synopsis
A story of sparkling imagination about the unwilling boy who drags readers into a fantasy world where courage, friendship, and loyalty are the law. Symbol of the perennial youth and desire for escapism that exists in all of us, Peter Pan, in the pen of J. M. Barrie, reminds us how to play and dream.


Biography
James Matthew Barrie (1860-1937) was a Scottish playwright and novelist, who became known primarily for the creation of Peter Pan. His hero's first mention comes from The Little White Bird, a novel published in 1902. Two years later, the play Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up would celebrate it. Finally, the play would be transformed into the novel Peter and Wendy (1911).
The figures of Peter Pan, Wendy and his brothers, the Lost Boys and all the other characters who cross and confront in Neverland were born from the stories the author enjoyed telling the five children of his friends Sylvia and Arthur Llewellyn Davies.


FunFacts
PETER PAN AS THE VILLAIN
Captain Hook was not always in the story. The original villain of the story was Peter Pan himself.

PETER PAN PLAYED BY AN ACTRESS
The first person to ever take on the role of Peter Pan was the English actress Nina Boucicault. Since then, it has become a tradition for a female to play the part of the titular character.

PETER PAN COULD FLY WITHOUT THE HELP OF FAIRY DUST
Originally Peter could fly without the help of Fairy Dust. Unfortunately, that led children to believe that if they tried enough, they too could take to the skies. After several injury reports, J. M. Barrie added Fairy Dust as a necessity for flying.

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